fbpx
(843) 238-5141
Mon–Thur 8:30AM–5:30PM | Fri 8:30AM–2PM
Make a Payment
(843) 238-5141
Mon–Thur 8:30AM–5:30PM | Fri 8:30AM–2PM
Make a Payment

Take the Time to Update Your Will

The Floyd Law Firm PC > Legal Sen$e > Take the Time to Update Your Will
Legal Sen$e - The Floyd Law Firm PC
Dalton B. Floyd, Jr., Attorney
By Dalton Floyd, Jr.

By some accounts, 70% of adult Americans do not have a will. If you have at least gone to the trouble of making a will, consider yourself ahead of the curve and pat yourself on the back. Then come back to earth and understand that your work is not completely done. A will is not a static instrument. To serve its purposes, it must keep current with life changes, including an individual’s financial circumstances, and with some external factors, such as tax laws. With the help of a professional, you should periodically review your will, staying alert to new or different circumstances that might call for updates.

Marriage, Divorce, and Remarriage

Obviously, a marriage usually brings a new beneficiary into the picture, and a divorce may remove one. Some of the changes in a will prompted by a change in marital status may not be so apparent. For example, when a widow or widower remarries, the will may need to be updated to show how children from the previous marriage and the new spouse are to be provided for.

Additions and Subtractions

A new child is a new beneficiary, but a will can and should cover more than just the distribution of property to heirs. Parents can name a guardian, and even an alternate guardian, to care for their children in the event that something happens to both parents. Absent such a provision in a will, a court will appoint a guardian.

The death of an executor, guardian, beneficiary, or trustee creates a gap in how the will is supposed to operate. Fill in the gaps by making necessary changes, such as naming a new individual or, in the case of a deceased beneficiary, simply removing him or her from the will.

Changing Fortunes

If you enjoy an unexpected windfall, you may still want the larger pie divided up as before. But it is likely that some changes in your will are called for. If the increase in the potential estate is large enough, it might trigger the need for planning to avoid or minimize estate taxes. A reversal of fortune could also suggest some changes. For example, you may have to revise downward that fixed sum you were planning to leave to a favorite charity.

Moving Out of State

You will not have to start from scratch if you move to another state, because all of the states recognize a will that was properly created in another state. Nonetheless, legal advice should be sought in the new state because changes in the law from state to state could require some tinkering with the will. There may be more than tinkering involved if you move to or from a community property state.

Changes in Tax Laws

The government’s intentions can change even if your intentions have not. Some of the changes benefit individuals with wills, but you can take full advantage of them only if you are aware of them. The big item here is changes to the federal estate tax exemption, which is the amount an estate can reach before it is subject to a (hefty) estate tax. In recent years the exemption has headed up, but there are no guarantees about what Congress will do with the exemption going forward.

You Change Your Mind

If you decide you want to change beneficiaries, a guardian, an executor, or anything else in a will, you can do so. For example, you want to make sure that the beneficiaries in your will are the same as the beneficiaries you have named in your insurance policies and retirement accounts. Otherwise, the beneficiaries actually named in those documents, not the beneficiaries under the will, will get the money from the policies and accounts. Bear in mind that no amount of talking about your new intentions will make them happen. The changes must be indicated in a properly executed will.

You should keep the finished (at least until the next update) product in a safe place. When “they” say “keep this with your important papers”, think of your will. Your family should know where to find the executed will. An unsigned copy of your will in its latest form is a good starting point for the next periodic review.

The Floyd Law Firm can help you find the peace of mind that comes from knowing that your affairs are in order and that those you love will not have to work through the difficulty of resolving the issues of an unplanned estate. We are focused on developing Estate Plans, Wills, and Trusts that are specifically tailored to each individual client’s needs – no matter how complex or straightforward.

Related Posts

Latest News & Info

The Floyd Law Firm Announces New Team Member, Attorney Marissa Drost
The Floyd Law Firm Announces New Team Member, Attorney Marissa Drost
October 13, 2021
Martindale-Hubbell Preeminent Lawyers Award Dalton Floyd, Jr.
Martindale-Hubbell Preeminent Lawyers Award Dalton Floyd, Jr.
September 27, 2021
The Floyd Law Firm Announces New Attorney Of Counsel Jonny McCoy
The Floyd Law Firm Announces New Attorney Of Counsel, Jonny McCoy
September 21, 2021

New & Info Categories

Subscribe to Our Newsletter

Subscribe

  • Please select which list(s) you would like to join below.
  • This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.